BIOGRAPHIES - J


PAGE INDEX


WILLIAM JACKSON
pages 369-369

William Jackson, a well known pioneer and successful farmer of Grand Forks township, located in Polk county in 1876 and has since been prominently identified with its agricultural development.  He was born at White Haven, in Cumberland, England, January 22, 1833 and lived there until 1868, when he came to Canada.  As a youth he learned the trade of the iron molder and worked at this trade for many years, in his native land and later in Canada.  Becoming ambitious to secure farming land, in 1876, he started west to Winnipeg where he had a large grant but his journey was destined to end at Fishers Landing [now Fisher, MN], where, an acquaintance on the steam boat, George Walsh, persuaded him the most desirable land was to be found. 

In Grand Forks he heard of a tract of railroad land in Grand Forks township, the first to be opened for settlement north of Grand Forks and this land he bought.  With some cash capital and a team of oxen he was enabled to begin immediately his farming activities and in the first year put sixty acres under cultivation.  The first home was a log house which was replaced in 1898 by a comfortable country home, pleasantly situated on the banks of the Red River.  Mr. Jackson has met with steady prosperity in his agricultural enterprise and has developed one of the model farm properties of Polk county.  This place is in section three of Grand Forks township, on the river and conveniently located, six miles north of Grand Forks. 

For many years he devoted his attention to the raising of grain but of later years has extended his interest to stock farming, raising short Horn cattle and dealing in dairy produce for private customers.  As a pioneer and able citizen, Mr. Jackson enjoys the respect of the community, being essentially that type of man, who receives the best from all associations, having maintained friendly and co-operative relations from the early days when the Indians were his frequent visitors to the times when a more aggressive citizenship is demanded.  As a member of the township board he has given active service in public affairs, promoting the improvement of roads and schools. 

He is the descendant of a long line of faithful adherents to the Presbyterian creed and is a member of the First Presbyterian church at Grand Forks.  He was married in his native land to Mary Ann Wild, who is also a native of Cumberland and they have three sons and two daughters, William, Thomas, John, who is a carpenter and resides at Brainerd, MN; Etta and Ida.  William Jackson and Thomas Jackson are associated with their father in the operation of the home farm.

[William is my great-grandfather.  If you are researching this name, please contact me...Jon Raymond]

submitted Jan 17, 2003 Jon Raymond

SOURCE: Compendium of History and Biography of Polk County, Minnesota, Major R.I.
Holcombe, Historical Editor; William H. Bingham, General Editor; W.H. Bingham
And Company, Minneapolis, Minn.; 1916; reprinted by Higginson Book Company;
Salem Massachusetts; (book no longer copyrighted)
Library of Congress control number 16009966
This book can be ordered from Borders Book Store or from Higginson.
Both companies have web sites.  The cost is about $70
and well worth the price.



WELLINGTON H. JEWELL

When Wellington H. Jewell, the oldest employe in length of continuous service in the Northern Division of the Great Northern railroad, first saw Crookston in 1872 it was a straggling hamlet of a few log cabins and gave little promise of becoming a city of 8,000 inhabitants, alive with quickened industrial, mercantile and commercial activities and blessed with all the concomitants of modern municipal progress.  He has been a resident of the city from that time to the present, and has contributed his share of the enterprise and force required to build and develop it to its present stature.

Mr. Jewell was born in the state of Maine in 1858, the son of Emanuel and Katharine (Houston) Jewell, the former a native of England the latter of Scotland.  The father was a farmer and carpenter.  He emigrated from his native land to Prince Edward Island.  After living there for a number of years, he moved to Maine, but later he took his family back to Price Edward Island, and he and the mother died there.  They were the parents of thirteen children and three of their sons are now residents of the United States.

Wellington H. Jewell remained on Price Edward Island until he reached the age of fourteen, then came to Crookston with his uncle, Robert Houston, who owned a part of the townsite.  For a number of years the uncle conducted a popular and profitable grocery store in Crookston.  He is now living in the city of Everett, Washington.  The nephew found employment in a modest capacity in the roundhouse of the Great Northern Railroad in 1875, and in October, 1880, was given an engine, and from that time until now he has been running one on the Northern Division of the road.  He is a member of the Masonic Order in several of its advanced branches, including the Mystic Shrine.

Mr. Jewell was married in Crookston in 1886 to Miss Annie Dreeland, who was born in Ottawa county, Province of Quebec, Canada.  They have three children: Katharine, who is the wife of John Bow, of Crookston; William E., who is in the railroad service, and Albert E., who is a machinist in the railroad shops in St. Paul.  The parents are widely known and held in much esteem for their genuine worth and the cordial and helpful interest they manifest in every undertaking for the good of the community.

submitted Jan 17, 2003 Jon Raymond

SOURCE: Compendium of History and Biography of Polk County, Minnesota, Major R.I.
Holcombe, Historical Editor; William H. Bingham, General Editor; W.H. Bingham
And Company, Minneapolis, Minn.; 1916; reprinted by Higginson Book Company;
Salem Massachusetts; (book no longer copyrighted)
Library of Congress control number 16009966
This book can be ordered from Borders Book Store or from Higginson.
Both companies have web sites.  The cost is about $70
and well worth the price.


JOHNSON, Nora

The Fertile Journal for May 23, 1973:

"Mrs. Nora Johnson, a life-long resident of the Fertile community, died May 15 at Fair Meadow Home at the age of 83 years.  She was born Jan. 26, 1890 in Garfield Township, daughter of Ole and Karina Rude.  She was baptized and confirmed in Little Norway Lutheran Church.  March 10, 1912 she married C. O. Johnson.  She was a member of St. John's Lutheran Church and the Ladies Aid and was a Gold Star Mother.

She is survived by eight sons: Rudolph, John and Olaf of Fosston; Alfred of Fertile; Walter, Hjalmer and Leonard of Crookston; Kenneth of Gary; 9 grandchildren, 2 great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.  She was preceded in death by her husband, parents and two sons.  She was the last remaining member of the Ole Rude family.

Funeral services were held Saturday at St. John's Lutheran Church at 2 p.m. with Rev. Carl Anderson officiating.  Burial was in St. John's Cemetery.  Erikson-Vik Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements."

The Minnesota Historical Society's microfilms of The Fertile Journal start with 1940, so I couldn't find an obit for Karine (1927).  Albert's and Nora's death certificates list their parents as Ole A. Rude and Karene Blovarp.  Karine's d.c. lists her parents as Christian Blovarp and unknown.  Karine was buried at Little Norway Lutheran Church cemetery too.

 


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Modified 25 MAR 2015, K. Kittleson